Patient Foot Care Education

Foot Care Education

Browse Our Library for Answers to Your Foot Care Questions

Choose any topic from the Patient Education sidebar at right. (Mobile users: if you don't see a sidebar, look for the "Patient Education Menu" button at the bottom of your screen.) To find a specific foot problem, choose "Foot Problems" in the menu for a list of topics.

You can also search our entire site for a particular foot topic by entering some text in the search field below. If you can't find what you're looking for, please give us a call or submit a contact form and we'll be glad to assist!

And, of course, when it comes to foot care, feel free to ask us anything.

Adult-acquired flatfoot or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction usually leads to a gradual loss of the arch. The posterior tibial muscle is a deep muscle in the back of the calf and has a long tendon that extends from above the ankle and attaches into several sites around the arch of the foot. The muscle acts like a stirrup on the inside of the foot to help support the arch. The posterior tibial muscle stabilizes the arch and creates a rigid platform for walking and running. If the posterior tibial tendon becomes damaged or tears, the arch loses its stability and as a result, collapses, causing a flatfoot.

Surgery is often performed to give the patient a more functional and stable foot. Several procedures may be required to correct a flatfoot deformity, depending on the severity of the problem. These may include:

  • Tenosynovectomy—a procedure to clean away (debridement) and remove any of the inflamed tissue around the tendon.
  • Osteotomy—removal of a portion of the heel bone (calcaneus) to move the foot structure back into alignment.
  • Tendon Transfer—in which replacement fibers from another tendon are inserted to help repair damage.
  • Lateral Column Lengthening—A procedure that implants a small piece of bone, usually removed from the hip, outside of the heel bone to create the proper bone alignment and rebuild the arch.
  • Arthrodesis—Fusing of one or more bones together to eliminate any joint movement, which stabilizes the foot and prevents any further deterioration or damage.